Step 3: Sort out the order for your points

Try to connect your points so that there is a flow of ideas, but don’t waste space on long connecting sentences which do not themselves convey information.
Start with your reasons for choosing the course, particularly if you have good supporting information (e.g. helping in a hospital supports an application to study medicine).
Putting the rest of the Personal Statement may prove to be more awkward, but the following example shows how to tackle it. Suppose you have these points to fit in:
1. School volleyball team
2. House representative
3. I like reading
4. Scuba diving
5. Have travelled
6. Helped at play-school
7. Got first aid certificate
8. Duke of Edinburgh bronze award.
You could start with 2 leading to 6 (both school-based and responsible), on to 7 and 8 (same sort of things, and 6, 7 might have counted towards the award). Then move onto sport. 1 first (still linked to school), then 4 (personal leisure), which might lead to 5 (places where you dived?). This leaves 3, which doesn’t follow on quite so naturally, but is linked, just about, through it being a leisure activity.
Each person is different, has different points to make, different details to add, but the principle of finding links to make the ideas flow into each other is the same for all.
Finding a good way to end your UCAS Personal Statement needs thought. Like the conclusion to an essay, you need to finish in a way that rounds the writing off . There’s no best approach to this, but a good option is go back to your reasons for choosing that degree, or for going to university generally, especially if you can refer to something relevant that you will do between now and when the course begins.
If you’re finding this stage hard, try putting each chunk of information into a separate paragraph, print out the result, cut it up into paragraphs and move them around on your desk to try different arrangements. You’re looking for a combination which works when you read it out.
Next: Step 4. Coming soon…